Doomed to repeat it.

A few weeks ago Brian Tannebaum wrote a post calling for a national conversation on law enforcement. He says ‘it’s time’ as if a police officer pepper spraying a group of peacefully protesting students would stay in our national memory long enough for us to actually have a discussion on it. We, and by ‘we’ I mean those of us who actually have our eyes opened to the way our justice system works, have asked for a conversation for a very, very long time. And we keep hoping that every time an incident comes up it will spur folks on.В  You know, like maybe seeing a group of white college students getting sprayed in the face might wake us up to what’s happening in our country. How can one not feel that something needs to change after watching this:

Oh, but COME ON Mirriam, we’ve all already seen that. Why are you so slow with all of this stuff – that was last month’s (week’s, yesterday’s) news.

And now we’ve moved on to something else.В  But here’s the thing, nothing has changed still. We are still here:

And perhaps we need to be reminded over and over and over again that these are real people who are standing up for things they believe in and are doing it non-violently. I’ve seen the video of ‘what really happened’ at UC Davis and the theory is those kids deserved it for failing to move along when told. Well, seems to me that in 1963 in Selma, those kids deserved it to since they also failed to abide by a lawful order. It really just depends on what you mean by lawful though, doesn’t it?

Stick our heads in the sand and pretend racism doesn’t exist anymore because we no longer open water hoses on people.В  Instead we do this:

 

Wait. That’s China.В  That’s not us.В  We would never do anything like that. I mean, we are a democracy after all.В  A civilized nation that would allow our citizens to, to, you know:

The time for a discussion about law enforcement is now. It’s then, it’s always. Because we do not learn from history, we continue to push forward without ever looking back, until it is just way too late.

Look, I don’t know what those Occupy people are protesting. I really have no idea. I think it has something to do with the staggering downward spiral of our economy – the fact that the rich get richer on the backs of the rest of it. I don’t agree with how they are doing this stuff. I mean, what kind of protest has no real purpose and where is it supposed to lead. But I believe in the power of their voice for whatever and I am kinda proud of them for doing something while the rest of us sit here in our suits and click away at the keyboard. Good for them for showing some courage in the face of all of us (and by us I mean me too) that are apathetic to whatever it is they are saying. And, after all, this is America and people can protest if they feel they need to. Right?

Right?

This is our country and look what we have made of it.В  We intend to spread democracy to poor, stupid nations like Afghanistan. We think Iran should not have nuclear power so we send in Drones. We assist in assassinations of our own citizens because we hold ourselves out to be the keeper of all that is good and right and moral and just. And meanwhile we act like savages to one another.

I am posting this after everyone else does so you don’t forget. I will keep posting the same shit from now until things change or I die or get sued again or whatever. But this cannot go on. We must make it stop. And by ‘we’ I mean me and you.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in: Not Gulity No Way   |     |   6 Comments

6 Responses

  1. Law blog roundup - On the Record - December 12, 2011

    [...] time for a discussion on law enforcement is [...]

  2. Attorney George E. Bourguignon, Jr. - December 29, 2011

    Congrats on making the ABA Journal’s fifth annual top 100 law blog list!

  3. Greenfield shines light on best in criminal law blogging for 2011 « Lawyers « Lawyer Help - January 2, 2012

    [...] incredibly moving posts, one by Mirriam Seddiq and another by Brian Tannebaum, that brought poignancy to the year’s travails, forcing us to [...]

  4. Greenfield shines light on best in criminal law blogging for 2011 : Real Lawyers Have Blogs - January 3, 2012

    [...] up the effort to give us a laugh where we would otherwise cry.Two incredibly moving posts, one by Mirriam Seddiq and another by Brian Tannebaum, that brought poignancy to the year's travails, forcing us to [...]

  5. Denver DUI Attorney - February 27, 2012

    Hopefully people start remembering these atrocities and bringing these cases into court. Unfortunately, it is difficult to convince any attorney to take on a 42 USC 1983 case. Likewise, very few politicians want to stand behind bills that expose police officers to the consequences of their unjust acts.

  6. James Rawstron - May 3, 2012

    Thanks for posting this. It always astonishes me at how Americans are willing to bring the pain to people exercising their constitutional rights when our nation was born on the backs of angry, drunk Bostonians who wouldn’t pay the tea tax anymore. In a representative republic, we all enter into an agreement that we support the rights of others to offend us — and we agree not to harm them for doing it. Keep fighting the good fight.

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